Australian Muslims Observe Eid Al-Fitr Amid The Coronavirus Pandemic

Eid al-Fitr follows weeks of fasting and marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan. I spent some time with the Abbas family in Melbourne as they broke fast and conducted their evening Taraweeh prayers.

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – MAY 22: Father of three Afrizal (left) of the Abbas family leads Taraweeh prayers with his family on May 22, 2020 in Melbourne, Australia. Muslim communities across Australia are finding ways to celebrate Eid al-Fitr marking the end of Ramadan, in smaller groups due to restrictions on gathering sizes due to COVID-19. Many mosques remain closed with some providing limited access and streaming prayer services. (Photo by Asanka Ratnayake/Getty Images)

Due to Covid-19 and the restrictions on large gatherings, Ramadan this year meant prayers wouldn’t take place in Mosques and breaking of fast couldn’t be conducted in large groups. Eid al-Fitr celebrations to would be confined within family homes.

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – MAY 22: The Abbas family break fast during Ramadan on May 22, 2020 in Melbourne, Australia. Muslim communities across Australia are finding ways to celebrate Eid al-Fitr marking the end of Ramadan, in smaller groups due to restrictions on gathering sizes due to COVID-19. Many mosques remain closed with some providing limited access and streaming prayer services. (Photo by Asanka Ratnayake/Getty Images)

Mother of three Dewi Andrina felt Ramadan this year felt more special and harmonious within the confines of their family home and allowed their family to be closer to their faith as a result allowing for more time to be dedicated to the teachings of their faith as a family. 

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – MAY 22: Dewi Andrina (left) Afrizal (centre) and their daughter Indy Abbas read the Quran following prayers on May 22, 2020 in Melbourne, Australia. Muslim communities across Australia are finding ways to celebrate Eid al-Fitr marking the end of Ramadan, in smaller groups due to restrictions on gathering sizes due to COVID-19. Many mosques remain closed with some providing limited access and streaming prayer services. (Photo by Asanka Ratnayake/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – MAY 22: Afrizal reads the Quran following prayers on May 22, 2020 in Melbourne, Australia. Muslim communities across Australia are finding ways to celebrate Eid al-Fitr marking the end of Ramadan, in smaller groups due to restrictions on gathering sizes due to COVID-19. Many mosques remain closed with some providing limited access and streaming prayer services. (Photo by Asanka Ratnayake/Getty Images)

To those celebrating, Eid-Mubarak to you and your families. 

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – MAY 22: The Abbas family sit around a laptop where they watch short videos on teachings from the Quran on May 22, 2020 in Melbourne, Australia. Dewi Andrina the mother of the family encourages her daughters to sit together at the end of prayers during Ramadan to watch videos on elements of the Quran as part of an informal Islamic studies class during Ramadan. Muslim communities across Australia are finding ways to celebrate Eid al-Fitr marking the end of Ramadan, in smaller groups due to restrictions on gathering sizes due to COVID-19. Many mosques remain closed with some providing limited access and streaming prayer services. (Photo by Asanka Ratnayake/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – MAY 22: The daughters of the Abbas family pay their respects to their parents following prayers on May 22, 2020 in Melbourne, Australia. Muslim communities across Australia are finding ways to celebrate Eid al-Fitr marking the end of Ramadan, in smaller groups due to restrictions on gathering sizes due to COVID-19. Many mosques remain closed with some providing limited access and streaming prayer services. (Photo by Asanka Ratnayake/Getty Images)

Images taken while #onassignment for @gettyimages 

Asanka Brendon Ratnayake is a photojournalist and travel photographer based in Melbourne Australia covering Australia, Asia and the Indian subcontinent. Follow him on instagram 

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