G20 Leaders Summit 2014 Brisbane

My first major political summit, first of many I hope. I have always had a great interest in geo-politics so getting the ‘guernsey’ to cover G20 was certainly a privilege. In saying this I wouldn’t be lying if I said it was a bit anti-climatic from a photographers point of view as most sessions were highly restricted for accredited media. Photographing press conferences can be mundane at the best of times let alone in rooms where the light is even & the backgrounds the same from most angles, so whenever the chance to shoot something slightly different presented itself I made sure to jump on it. Nevertheless being in the presence of some of the world biggest movers & shakers, the various press corps & delegates made for an interesting experience.

Below are a few of my selects.

United States of America, President Barack Obama walks towards the podium to speak during his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
United States of America President Barack Obama walks towards the podium to speak during his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
Australian Prime Minster Tony Abbott speaks during his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
Australian Prime Minster Tony Abbott speaks during his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
President of the European Council Herman Van Rompuy makes an expression during a Joint EU Presidential media briefing at the G20 Leader's summit at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
President of the European Council Herman Van Rompuy makes an expression during a Joint EU Presidential media briefing at the G20 Leader’s summit at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
United Kingdom Prime Minster David Cameron speaks during his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
United Kingdom Prime Minster David Cameron speaks during his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
United States of America, President Barack Obama speaks and makes a gesture with his hands during his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
President Barack Obama speaks and makes a gesture with his hands during his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon makes a gesture while he addresses the press during at the G20 Leader's summit at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon makes a gesture while he addresses the press during at the G20 Leader’s summit at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
Police form a line to block protestors from walking through the CBD during the G20 Leader's summit held in Brisbane Australia. Protests were held in a peaceful manner under the close observation of Police.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
Police form a line to block protestors from walking through the CBD during the G20 Leader’s summit held in Brisbane Australia. Protests were held in a peaceful manner under the close observation of Police. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
Aboriginal rights activists protest during the G20 Leader's summit held in Brisbane Australia. Protests were held in a peaceful manner under the close observation of Police.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
Aboriginal rights activists protest during the G20 Leader’s summit held in Brisbane Australia. Protests were held in a peaceful manner under the close observation of Police. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
A G20 protestors holds up a sign reading 'Don't shoot' in front of a police officer during the G20 Leader's summit held in Brisbane Australia. Protests were held in a peaceful manner under the close observation of Police.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
A G20 protestors holds up a sign reading ‘Don’t shoot’ in front of a police officer during the G20 Leader’s summit held in Brisbane Australia. Protests were held in a peaceful manner under the close observation of Police. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
 President Barack Obama waves goodbye at the conclusion of his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
President Barack Obama waves goodbye at the conclusion of his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
Australian Prime Minster Tony Abbott arrives to speak during his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
Australian Prime Minster Tony Abbott arrives to speak during his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
Managing Director of the IMF (International Monetary Fund) Madame Christine Lagarde speaks and makes a gesture with her hand during her final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
Managing Director of the IMF (International Monetary Fund) Madame Christine Lagarde speaks and makes a gesture with her hand during her final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
President Barack Obama (silhouette) walks off the stage at the conclusion of his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit.  (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved
President Barack Obama (silhouette) walks off the stage at the conclusion of his final press conference at the Brisbane Convention and Exhibition Centre in Brisbane at the conclusion of the g20 Leaders Summit. (c) Asanka Brendon Ratnayake all right reserved

Shutdown Bangkok, Restart Thailand

Normally the 2nd week of January sees me getting ready to cover the Australian Open Tennis Grand Slam but a few days out from the tournament a change of plans meant I had a totally different assignment in Bangkok. Personally for me it was a welcome change, it had been some time since I last covered something in the field that wasn’t of the sporting variety.

‘Shutdown Bangkok, restart Thailand’ was the motto used by Anti Thai Government protestors from the People’s Democratic Reform Committee (PDRC). Protesters closed key intersections in Bangkok, as part of an effort to shut down the city and pressure prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra to resign. Protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban of the PDRC had setup Rally Stages at 20 major intersections to disrupt the work of government officials attempting to ‘Paralyse Bangkok’.
The rallies grew to include thousands of people at some points. Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra responded by dissolving the House and declaring a state of Emergency on the 21st of January.

While for the most part protests were peaceful, at times it even had a festival feel to it with markets & entertainment, a state of emergency was declared due to increasing attacks at protest sites.These included grenade attacks and drive-by shootings.

On the 19th of January at the Victory Monument site, 28 people were wounded when two grenades were thrown.

Another grenade attack on a protest march on the 19th of January killed one man and reportedly injured 30.
Yingluck called a snap election for February 2 in an attempt to end the crisis that was prompted by a failed attempt in September to introduce an amnesty bill in parliament that would have allowed her brother Thaksin Shinawatra to return from exile without having to serve a two year jail sentence for corruption.

– Asanka Brendon Ratnayake

Anti-Government protesters march in an attempt to shutdown the Government Savings Bank
Anti-Government protesters march in an attempt to shutdown the Government Savings Bank
An Anti-Thai Government protestor poses for a photo as a man walks past using his smart phone. The PDRC supporters have been actively using social media networks and smart phones as a method of communication throughout the Shutdown Bangkok protests.
An Anti-Thai Government protestor poses for a photo as a man walks past using his smart phone. The PDRC supporters have been actively using social media networks and smart phones as a method of communication throughout the Shutdown Bangkok protests.
An unarmed Army officer takes a photo of a office worker posing with an Army officer in front of Sandbags positioned at one of the Skyrail stations in Bangkok.
An unarmed Army officer takes a photo of a office worker posing with an Army officer in front of Sandbags positioned at one of the Skyrail stations in Bangkok.
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
Anti-Thai government protestors (PDRC) wave the Thai Flag at Victory Monument, one of the many protest sites spread throughout Bangkok.
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
Anti-Thai government protestors (PDRC) raise their arms in support during a rally at the Victory Monument.
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
A group of anti-government protestors in an abandoned apartment complex look out for a suspect whom threw an explosive device injuring 30 people during an anti-government street rally on January 17, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
An Anti-Government protester about to exit a window allegedly housing the suspect who threw an explosive device injuring 30 people during an anti-government street rally on January 17, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
Anti-Government protestors guard a door of the alledged suspect who threw an explosive device injuring 30 people during an anti-government street rally on January 17, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
A Anti-Government protestor makes a gesture to the crowd from the roof of the apartment of a suspect who threw an explosive device injuring 30 people during an anti-government street rally on January 17, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
Anti-Government protestors search a room for arms in a room that was housing the suspect whom threw an explosive device injuring 30 people during an anti-government street rally on January 17, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
An Army officer inspects the point of impact of a Grenade attack near the Victory Monument protest site.
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
An Anti-Government security guard holds up a ripped T-Shirt as a result of the grenade attack near a street side vendor in the vicinity of the Victory Monument rally site .The grenade attack reportedly injured 28 people at the protest site at the Victory Monument in Bangkok Thailand
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
Anti-Government protester security guards run in search for the attacker who used a grenade.The grenade attack reportedly injured 28 people at the protest site at the Victory Monument in Bangkok Thailand
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
A women makes a peace sign with her hands as she rides a truck driving towards the Government savings bank in an attempt to shutdown the Government Savings Bank in Bangkok Thailand
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
Anti-Government Protestors cheer and blow whistles at the Royal Thai Police Head quarters in response to an explosive device reportedly injuring as many as 30 people and killing one the previous day during an anti-government street rally in Bangkok, Thailand
Antigovernment Protesters Shut Down Bangkok
Anti-Government supporters lock arms at the front of the Government Savings Bank in an attempt to shut the bank down in Bangkok Thailand.

A full slideshow of the full photo essay can be viewed on my website by clicking the link below

http://abrfoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-slideshow/G0000_RzuVVvUPhw/C0000B5ovC3I8eXw?start=

Digging through the archives: Following Sarath Fonseka Part 1 (pre-election)

With Former Army General Sarath Fonseka been released from prison on Monday the 21st of May 2012 I thought it was an apt time to revisit the time I spent following him during his presidential campaign in 2010 for my digging through the archives series.

Now for those unfamiliar let me try & summarise very quickly a bit about the man. The former Army General played a pivotal in ending Sri Lanka’s 26 year civil war.  Once the war was over, President Mahinda Rajapakse some argue in an attempt to sideline him from political activity gave Fonseka the post of ‘Chief of Defence Staff’, not long after Fonseka quit the post & officially announced his candidature in the 2010 Sri Lankan presidential election that he subsequently lost.  Two weeks after his loss he was arrested & found guilty for “committing military offences”; charges could best be described as dubious & varied from corrupt arms deals to plots to overthrow the government while in uniform. To date his has pleaded his innocence.  Fonseka was imprisoned for 3 years but was given a presidential pardon after serving just over 2 years & released on Monday.

For me id be lying if there wasn’t some sentimental feeling about his release, back in 2010 I had left Australia to try & forge a career as a photojournalist, I took up a post at the Sri Lankan Sunday paper ‘The Sunday Leader’. My first major assignment was to follow Fonseka on his presidential campaign. For over a month I travelled around the island from rallies in the outstations to the major cities, from press conferences to ‘kissing the babies’ opportunities.  It was exciting for a young ‘PJ’ , especially coming from Australia where I find election campaigns or politics in general dull by comparison; this campaign had a heavy weight boxing match spirit to it. In a sign of defiance against the Rajapaksa regime Fonseka not only formed his own party but had the backing & support of the major opposition party the right leaning United National Party (UNP) & oddly enough the Marxist ‘Peoples Liberation Front’ known as the JVP.

While there was minor difference in policy, the presidential battle was becoming increasingly spiteful & acrimonious. Election violence was becoming progressively worse with “pro-governement thugs” threatening & terrorising opposition supporters. The homes of opposition party members were being firebombed, buses of fonseka supporters were shot at & political rallies in themselves became violent battlegrounds between supporters.   People were getting killed & severely attacked on a daily basis.

As the campaign drew to its end you couldn’t help but feel something big was going to happen, it was a very tense time, many sleepless nights, clutching onto my phone in anticipation for a big story to cover. From a photographic perspective it was a great learning curve in terms of covering large gatherings & rallies, as a foreigner one thing that stood out for me was how passionate supporters of the various parties are, in Australia its seems rather contrived by comparison.  Capturing this ‘passion’ was equally as important as getting a good photo of Fonseka himself.

Election day arrived, people went to the polls & I sneaked my way into the polling booths (media arent allowed inside the polling halls). By midday I had got my photos & had been warned enough by army personal not to enter any more polling booths. By mid afternoon I was back at the newsdesk going through my work from the month. The only things left in the campaign were taking photos of the victor & the loser the following day…so I thought.

Part 2 to come…